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On 18 February 2015, Dr W. Dirksen, Director of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University, the management of the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals of this faculty and André Romijn, Publishing Director of VetVisuals© International, signed an agreement to create an educational partnership

On 18 February 2015, Dr. Wim Dirksen, Director of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Utrecht University, the management of the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals of this faculty (Managing Director Dick de Haan (left) Clinic Director prof.dr. Jan Willem Hesselink) and André Romijn, Publishing Director of VetVisuals© International (right), signed an agreement to create an educational partnership combining the respective strengths of each party. The aim of this innovative collaboration is to produce and deliver engaging, high quality, interactive multimedia teaching modules in the field of veterinary medicine. Continue reading...

The association between canine hyperadrenocorticism and thrombosis is based on several retrospective reports of small numbers of dogs with confirmed TED

Thromboembolism is defined as the obstruction of a blood vessel by a blood clot (thrombus), which may have formed locally or have translocated from a distant site in the body. The consequences and clinical signs of thromboembolic disease (TED) depend on the location and severity of thrombosis, but it may be fatal, particularly in the case of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The association between canine hyperadrenocorticism and thrombosis is based on several retrospective reports of small numbers of dogs with confirmed TED. In some cases hyperadrenocorticism was noted to be an underlying condition. Read more about Canine hyperadrenocorticism & thromboembolic disease.

Proteinuria is commonly detected in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) and a prevalence of 46 - 71% has been reported.

Small amounts of protein may be detected in the urine of healthy patients, however proteinuria is defined as the presence of an abnormal amount of protein in the urine. It is recommended that all dogs with hyperadrenocorticism be screened for proteinuria. Commonly used screening methods include urine dipstick, the sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) turbidometric test and the microalbuminuria test. Read more about Canine hyperadrenocorticism & proteinuria.

A functional adrenal tumour is suspected in dogs with an adrenal mass(es), in combination with abnormal results on dexamethasone suppression testing, ACTH stimulation testing or both. Low endogenous ACTH levels also provide supportive evidence that a functional adrenal tumour may be present. Clinical signs of functional adrenal tumours are identical to those of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and include polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, weight gain, a pot-bellied appearance, alopecia and excessive panting. Read article about medical treatment of functional adrenocortical tumors.

A functional adrenal tumour is suspected in dogs with an adrenal mass(es), in combination with abnormal results on dexamethasone suppression testing, ACTH stimulation testing or both. Low endogenous ACTH levels also provide supportive evidence that a functional adrenal tumour may be present. Clinical signs of functional adrenal tumours are identical to those of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism and include polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, weight gain, a pot-bellied appearance, alopecia and excessive panting. Read article about medical treatment of functional adrenocortical tumors.

Standards for Clinical and Histological Diagnosis of Canine and Feline Liver Diseases - eBook

This eBook is made for use in veterinary practice and for pathologists as an aid in making and understanding the diagnosis of all liver diseases of dogs and cats which are known to date. It is also meant to be a guide for the veterinary profession in the standardized diagnostic approach and nomenclature of liver diseases.

specific cardiomyopathies kerry simpson feline medice vetvisuals on education

There are many different forms of specific cardiomyopathy reported in man, and many of these also apply to the cat.  Amongst the most common are thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy, and hypertensive cardiomyopathy.  Other potential causes of cardiomyopathy include uraemic cardiomyopathy and diabetic cardiomyopathy.  However, at present there is no convincing evidence that either of these diseases initiate significant heart disease in the cat. Less common causes of myocardial disease include acromegaly and infiltrative or inflammatory disease.Diagnosis of specific diseases culminating in myocardial disease can be highly satisfying, as diagnosis of an underlying disease, increases the potential for ‘cure’, a scenario that is rare in cardiology. A video-lecture presented by Dr Kerry Simpson.

 Learning Objectives:

  1. Appreciate the range of diseases that can lead to specific cardiomyopathies and how to identify these diseases
  2. Understand that treating of the underlying disease may reverse some/all of the cardiac abnormalities
  3. Appreciate that a specific cardiomyopathy, whilst taking more to diagnose, can carry a markedly improved prognosis in comparison to primary cardiac disease

Pneumonia’s in the Cat Respiratory Disease kerry simpson veterinary cpd online education

Cats with lower respiratory tract disease will typically present with coughing, dyspnoea, and occasionally in severe cases central cyanosis (which is present when there is more than 5g/dl of deoxygenated haemoglobin present).  Cough is a sudden expiratory effort, initially against a closed glottis, producing a forced expulsion of air from the lungs.  Coughing results from stimulation of the cough receptors, located in the larynx, trachea and bronchial tree.  Therefore, cats with cardiac or pleural space disease rarely cough (although cats with pyothorax may have a concurrent pneumonia which can lead to coughing).  In addition, the respiratory pattern should be carefully assessed.  Cats with pulmonary parenchymal disease will show an expiratory pattern, which is typically restrictive; whereas those with pleural space disease will demonstrate an inspiratory restrictive inspiratory dyspnoea. Read here more about causes, investigation and treament about pneumonia’s in the cat.

Radiographic signs of abdominal disease edoardo auriemma dog cat video cpd

This video presented by Dr. Edoardo Auriemma DVM Dip. ECVDI, is a guide in the diagnostic approach to an abdominal radiograph. Abdominal radiographs often represents the first Imaging procedure in the diagnostic work up of the vomiting patient; this technique can provide essential information to the clinician before referring the patient to further diagnostic procedures (i.e. ultrasonography). If you want to learn a correct understanding of the radiographic anatomy of the abdomen and how to execute a systematic approach to an abdominal radiograph, start video-lecture 'Radiographic signs of abdominal disease' now.

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Assessment and Stabilisation of the Cat with Pleural Effusion

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